When Enough is Not Enough

May 8th, 2018 Posted by Thought Tools 57 comments

I invested a day last week advising the executive team of a Nashville-based business with branches in several southern states.  My job was to help them resolve several challenges caused by their rapid growth.  One question we explored concerned whether the company had grown enough and should henceforth do nothing but aim to maintain its current annual revenue level. 

Several of the executives expressed satisfaction with what they had achieved over the past few years, both in the business as well as in their personal lives.  They felt content and although they were fairly young men and women, they saw their hard-work-years as having ended.  They now saw themselves as treading water rather than trying to win any races.  “We don’t need any more money,” they told me.

During the same week, I received a letter from an individual whom I had been advising regarding his career.  One paragraph read:

“I am fascinated by how you teach people to learn to love the work they should do.  But how do I know what is the work that I should do?  Is it the work that would pay me the most?  If so, that doesn’t really work for me as I am definitely NOT money-motivated, (although my wife thinks I should be).  I don’t need to make more money, I just want to do meaningful work.  If all I was supposed to do in this world was make a lot of money (to have what to give away-not a bad thing), why did I waste so much of my adult life in education?”

It was another of those not uncommon instances of synchronicity. In one week I was asked the same question twice; once by an executive team and once by an unrelated individual.  The question:  Is it okay for someone to make much less than he could provided he is content with what he has? 

At first glance, you might think that all the people involved are indeed exemplary.  After all, money just isn’t that important to them.  They exhibit a contentment with life and are willing to step off the financial treadmill.  Surely they ought to be applauded?

A very difficult task now falls to your rabbi.  I must try to explain to you why they are wrong, just as I had to explain it to them last week. 

As the Shabbat ends each Saturday night, by the flickering light of the Havdalah candle Jews sing this verse signalling the start of a new week of work.

When you eat of the labor of your hands, you will be happy
and all will be well with you.
(Psalms 128:2)

In this verse, King David reiterates the value of work, the same purpose for which God placed Adam in the Garden of Eden. (Genesis 2:15)

Nowhere in Scripture is found any implication that we ought to work only until we have enough.  Neither is there any acknowledgement of the unhealthy practice of retirement which is really only another way of saying, “I’ll work only until have enough”.

I know this feels a bit awkward because we’ve been raised to believe the virtue of contentment.  “He who is contented is rich,” is only one of hundreds of proverbs and idioms all praising the person who says, “I have enough”. 

However, to have enough is not why we work.  That would be an incredibly selfish approach to work.  We work because God created us to serve other people and our work is how we do it.  For this reason, the Lord’s language, Hebrew uses the same word—OVeD—for worship as well as for doing our daily labor. 

We shall worship  the Lord
נעבד את ה…
(Joshua 24:15)

Six days you shall work
ששת ימים תעבד
(Exodus 20:9)

In the same way that there is no “enough” to our worship of God, there is also no “enough” to our daily work.  We don’t work for money; we work to serve others; our customers, clients, or associates.  The money follows almost automatically and confirms that we have really served.  There is no point at which I have cared for God’s other children enough.  It is a lifetime mission. 

Although it flies in the face of popular thinking, there is no virtue is thinking one has enough money.  One should certainly be happy with whatever one currently has, but never content.  The difference is that happiness does not kill ambition; contentment does. 

Obviously, God does not want us to sacrifice our lives, our faith, our families and our friendships to make more money.  However, as long as we work with integrity, in the specific time allotted for our daily work and with the energy dedicated to that purpose, the more we can make usually shows the more effectively we are serving God’s other children. It would be wrong to try to limit that.

Hebrew possesses a word a word for satisfied (SoVaH – שבע) which is as close as the language comes to contentment. The important point is that SoVaH is never used in the context of money and mostly appears in connection with food.

And you shall eat and be satisfied (SoVaH) and bless the Lord your God..;
(Deuteronomy 8:10) 

The good that one can do with money is proportional to how much is available. There is an old joke about the beggar accustomed to getting a dollar from one of his ‘regulars’ who passed by each day.  On one occasion the passerby dropped a quarter into the beggar’s cap.  “Hoy!” called the hobo. “Why only a quarter today?”

“I’m having a tough week in my business” answered the man. 

The panhandler’s response:

“Just because you’re having a bad week, I have to have one too?”

Just because you decide that you have enough money, do all those who depend upon you and those who might benefit from you also have to say enough? 

To the individual I was counseling, I added the observation that his marriage might well benefit from his increasing his revenue.  To the company I added that not only was it the right thing to grow the company (within the limits of managerial capability) and find ways to serve even more customers but there was also a strategic reason to continue growth.  In the real world, whether you’re looking at a beautiful flower or a profitable business, the same thing is true.  It is either growing or dying. Staying the same is not an option.

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57 comments

Susan Gilliland says:

Very timely in today’s culture of condemning those that have wealth and the youth out there feeling guilty they have work and their buddies do not. Thanks again for your wisdom.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Thanks Susan,
We were a bit worried that this topic would be a little too shocking. What! Enough is not good? Well, enough food is great. In fact more than enough is not good. But enough money doesn’t exist. Provided, as we emphasized, its pursuit doesn’t intrude on other important areas of life.
Warmest regards,
Cordially,
RDL

Harry Weisburd says:

Does Jewish Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg ,Multi billionaire have enough ?????
I
I. DON’T THINK SO !! He wants. To Censor and Ban Conservative thought on Facebook. !!!!

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

No, Harry,
And neither does Mormon Mitt Romney or Protestant Rupert Murdoch or Muslim Mohamed Fayed.
Cordially,
RDL

A.J. Hoffman says:

The ant shows diligence without praise.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Indeed, AJ,
Consider the ant and be wise…(Proverbs 6:6)
Cordially,
RDL

Dan says:

Good article Rabbi. I have stricken the word retirement right out of my vocabulary. I hardly ever say it. Interestingly, by doing this my thinking has changed to working in some capacity for as long as I can. Besides, I’ve heard a lot of men die shortly after they retire. Not a good incentive for someone who wants to live a long and prosperous life!

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Well done, Dan,
Not only will you work longer and be healthier but you’ll also work better without internalizing an expiration date. You will prosper more.
Cordially,
RDL

David J says:

Great advances in technology, medicine, arts, music, knowledge, etc. were not made by people who thought they had enough. Isn’t it really a simple concept? I can understand people getting tired and wanting to rest, but greatness isn’t achieved while resting.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Well said, David,
And great enterprises of all kinds are not built while resting. You are both accurate and articulate. I wish I’d made your point explicitly in the Thought Tool
Cordially,
RDL

Brian F. Tucker says:

Dear Rabbi,
Speaking again from my own experience, Have to some what disagree. I’ve never made a lot of money. But I have a wonderful wife, two great children , a roof over my head, a car to drive, clothes on my back and food to eat. We seemed to have enough to eat out, take trips, etc. We also had enough to give our tithe and donate to various local charities as well as programs such as 700 club, TCM and AJW. I am retired now from my company but I still do graphic design as well as fine art. (“No word in the bible for RETIREMENT”). So even though I no longer draw a salary, God is still providing for us. I do agree that we should all try to be the best we can be. But we hear often about broken homes, death from stress related causes and children having to grow up with out any parental guidance because mom or dad were to busy chasing the almighty dollar.
God Bless, Brian

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Dear Brian,
I may not have been as unequivocal as necessary when I emphasized in the Thought Tool that pursuit of opportunity to serve, which results in revenue, is never to be at expense of integrity or of time that should be dedicated to other important areas of life. Within time and energy devoted to work, make the most. I see nothing in your letter that disagrees with what I wrote. You certainly have been blessed
Cordially
RDL

Teena says:

Thank you Rabbi for this reply. I, like Brian, have come to the end of a 30 yr. occupation, but have not at all stopped working to spend time in recreation or otherwise, like rest. I love giving into God’s purpose, and to help whoever He places on my heart. I’m not being dependent on anyone but God is the point which is more intimidating because I have to ask His direction and trust Him for ideas (l’ve sometimes bypassed these steps with a steady paycheck). In fact, I wish employers would be less discriminating against us more seasoned people and hire me. I want to be a value. The world’s system has people so dependent on IT; with overuse of credit cards, overspending, excessive recreation, etc., that most people can not “retire” because of the debt and dependency.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Dear Teena

I quite agree with your two points; crazy not to hire older more experienced people and the problem of debt. However, it is with your salutation that I must respectfully take issue. You thank only me, when there is nothing I write that isn’t the result of constant collaboration with my wife, Susan.
Here is what I wrote in the beginning of our first book–America’s Real War (which we hope to republish soon with new sections on Islam’s impact on the world post 9-11)

Which brings me to Susan. This book is as much a product of our collaboration as are our children, for she and I have brought these ideas into being together as surely as our children are also the fruit of our unity. We write together, we home build together, we child raise together, why, we even boat and vote together. Although no word of this volume was sent to the publisher until we both agreed, to the extent you find fault, I can assure you it will be with those passages on which she yielded to me. It would make as little sense for me to thank her for her help in this book as it would make for a left leg to thank a right leg for its help in crossing a street. This is our book.

It obviously applies to all that appears in our weekly emails and on this site. Thanks for giving me the opportunity to make this point.
Cordially
RDL

Egils Vigants says:

Thank you Rabbi for as always, providing “food for thought”….God bless

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

You’re welcome, Egils,
Enough may be a word that doesn’t apply to money or Thought, but it does apply to food!
Cordially,
RDL

Susan R says:

Thank you for your words of wisdom. I agree with other comments. I too am going to continue to work in some capacity as long as I can. I will be at that big retirement age in a few months but stay active, strive to serve my fellow people, and continue to work from our home. However, our son-in-law plans to retire at the age of 50 because they will then have “enough”. Sad.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Dear Susan,
Perhaps your son-in-law plans to “retire” only from his current work in order to start a new career in other work he eagerly anticipates?
Let’s hope.
Cordially,
RDL

Lavene Elliott says:

I’m truly inspired by your thought tools. I have been reading your book on business secrets and it is really reshaping my paradigm about money. Thanks for the insight in your post.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

So pleased to hear from you, Lavene,
This is good news. When you have the opportunity check out the other financial abundance resources we have prepared such as the Prosperity Power audio program.
Cordially,
RDL

The things that make you go hmmmmmm? I have some sorting to do. What a wonderful thought provoking thought tool. Well, that settles it, I’m gonna be a millionaire. You guys are such a blessing, I really look forward to receiving emails from both of you. Love.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Dear Louis,
You can’t imagine how much letters like yours encourage us in our work!
The only thing I can’t understand is why you self-impose that millionaire limitation?
Cordially,
RDL

Chad says:

This is a very timely lesson for me. I work in my family’s grocery business that was started by grandfather in 1967. I have been working in the maintenance department for the last 8 years. I have found myself quite happy there because I get to use my education as an engineer to improve how our refrigeration systems operate and solve some of the most challenging problems we’ve been having. However, circumstances have recently changed. My grandfather recently passed away, and my father wants me to come into the office to learn how the business operates. This will take me off of the road. I have been a bit hesitant to make this move because I really like working with the machinery, and I have some unique skills that our other techs don’t have. However, the company needs me in the office because we have 800 employees who depend on us keeping afloat. Your lesson is making me confront that I may have become content in my position.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Dear Chad,
Move from machinery to management promptly and passionately. If you choose to, you will come to enjoy it every bit as much as you enjoy the work you now do. And you’ll make your grandfather very proud. And the best news of all, one of the finest backgrounds for business management, perhaps even the very best, is engineering. Onwards and upwards. You’ll never look back.
Cordially,
RDL

Chris K. says:

A very interesting article, indeed. I would posit that for many of us, retirement doesn’t mean ceasing to serve others, and “having enough” doesn’t necessarily equate to complacency. For example, I would love to have enough money so I could retire from what I am doing now and live off the money I’ve saved, thus enabling my family and me to serve others in different ways–ways that might not pay much, if anything, but that would now be viable options since I had earned “enough” during my working career.

I agree that the idea of spending the last couple of decades of one’s life sitting in a rocking chair on a porch is antithetical to Biblical teaching, but for a growing number of Americans, retiring simply means transitioning from one avenue of service to another.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Dear Chris,
As a beneficiary of your wise financial counsel myself, I probe your letter only with reluctance. However, if the goal is truly to serve, why not let the market hint at where the world mostly desires your service?
If, on the other hand, the true goal is to engage in activity you personally find meaningful perhaps even more meaningful than your 8am-6pm service to God’s children, then it is a bit more like a hobby. And if so, do it evenings and weekends while continuing your primary form of service to the world.
I entirely agree that more and more are happily eschewing the retirement rocking chair for new careers. Some choose volunteer (unpaid) activities. While certainly better than the rocking chair option, just ask the organization providing volunteer positions whether they’d rather have the person coming in every day to staple & collate (or whatever) or whether they’d rather receive a hefty donation of money from that now non-volunteer who kept making money (and giving it away). And ask the honest volunteer whether one derives greater happiness and deeper satisfaction from “stapling and collating” or from giving significant financial gifts. I think that perhaps both responses help lend weight to my perspective.
What say you?
Warmest regards,
Cordially,
RDL

Chris says:

Thank you for your thoughtful and, as usual, very insightful response. You make a valid point, but I think there are some people who would actually feel better about doing volunteer work, because they have been convinced by society that making money is somehow greedy, and working for no pay is virtuous. I vehemently disagree, of course, but for them, perhaps volunteer work is their best option.

Also, there are certain people who, for whatever reason, simply aren’t equipped to work in professions which offer them any sort of significant income potential. For these people, volunteering might actually be a better financial choice, based on the value of their work versus what they could give financially to a charitable organization if they continued working in the private sector to earn a paycheck.

Thanks again for sharing your wisdom!

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Yes, very true, Chris,
For many people, that could be best way. There is no one size fits all when it comes to human beings which is our essential argument with socialism. You can easily put all cows in one barn but trying to fit many humans, each uniquely created in the image of our Creator, is quite impossible. Those who see humans as no more than sophisticated orangutans will try one size fits all. Just see government housing in St Louis, Chicago, Manhattan, Moscow or Havana.
Cordially
RDL

Jean Heinz says:

Again, Thanks Rabbi for teaching what so many won’t.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Thanks Jean,
One of the secrets of God’s plan for human economic interaction is specialization. Wherein each of us tries to serve God’s other children by doing that which others can’t or won’t do.
Cordially,
RDL

Debbie Evans says:

When nursing, I observed many times as, the snow birds would come down and settle in our small town. Shortly they would die, from one thing or another but mostly caused by loneliness. I was young, but observant, sadden by their states. Later as a nurse I saw it repeated too, many times as well. I use to say I’ll never retire. But the devil had much more in store for my life.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

That’s a sad but true observation, Debbie,
I hope your somewhat cryptic letter conceals a life of blessing and happiness.
Cordially
RDL

Kay Anderson says:

Excellent article.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Thanks Kay.
With appreciation
Cordially
RDL

Carl from SC says:

Thx, more bountiful homework……I too have seen many who ‘retired’ die within 5 years, including my father (died at 89, addicted to TV-that is why we do not have one in our home).
And I love to share, ‘I’m not in my prime’, and ‘What is the worst society can do to me, Promise me Viet Nam a second time……or ‘Argue for your limitations, and they are YOURS’.
Have a GREAT DAY my RABBI.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

And a great day right back at you, Carl,
Cordially
RDL

James says:

Those who receive but money for their labors deprive themselves of the joy of serving others. But even considering money alone, it is still wise to grow and develop further, for who can foresee the future? Today’s ‘enough’ can quickly become tomorrow’s famine. I am reminded of the calamitous decision of a certain manufacturer of photographic film; for they were at the very threshold of digital camera technology, yet declined to pursue it. Today who uses photographic film? I cannot even find it in the supermarket.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Dear James,
Thanks for writing and your story of Kodak is illustrative and largely accurate. Kodak did actually develop digital photograph 1975-1985 but decided not to bring it to market. They did however own the patent from which they made billions. Didn’t help though, they filed for bankruptcy about ten years ago. That’s up to where I agree with your welcome words.
However, and it is a huge ‘however’, your very common mistake that somehow getting paid means you are not serving others is terribly wrong. For one thing, I bet you never check out of a hotel room without leaving a gift for the housekeeping staff. That is because over and above their job, you appreciate the service they are providing you. Same goes in most restaurants and other places.
The fact that I get paid for doing my job in no way changes the fact that I am serving my customers, clients, or boss. Doing something for somebody as a favor is another story altogether. A favor is a favor. Fine. But when somebody provides me with competent professional service at a fair price, he or she is most definitely serving me. What is more, I wouldn’t want them to do it for free as it would inevitably be a low priority item on their TO DO list.
Doing your job well is joyful precisely because you are serving others. The proof is that they pay you.
I know this is counter-intuitive and for that reason I usually spend quite a bit of the time dedicated to the many speeches, workshops, and seminars I do for churches and synagogues around the country explaining and proving this point. Doing a favor for a friend is wonderful. But providing professional services (no matter what your field) for free is less meritorious not more than charging a fair market rate, namely your salary, wages, or fees.
Cordially
RDL

James says:

‘Those who receive but money for their labors deprive themselves of the joy of serving others.’ I am indeed sorry that you seem to misunderstand me. When I labor to receive money, I am glad of the money as financial support, of course. But I receive not only the money: I delight in receiving ALSO the joy of serving others. Yet I have known others who labor BUT for the money and are in it to get paid and that’s as far as it goes. These folks doom themselves to poverty. Sorry ‘bout that.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

No problem, James,
I get it.
Thanks for writing
Cordially
RDL

Karen says:

Thanks Rabbi for your teachings. I would be interested in hearing how you counsel women vs men in regards to the subject of work (paid employment). It would be nice to hear from Susan as to how she divides her time between serving her family and household and in performing any paid work and how that has changed over the years.

Susan Lapin says:

Ah, Karen, I am going to be ever so politically incorrect on this. I actually looked in my Musings to see if I had written something on this and though I didn’t find it, I can’t believe that I haven’t. The bottom line is that while both men and women are capable of earning money (and single women often out-earn single men) it is an entirely different matter on a spiritual basis. I have a lot to say on this, but for here, suffice it to say that this is a huge male/female divide and what my husband wrote applies to men but not necessarily to women.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Dear Karen–
Nearby Susan responds as you requested. However, it is where you thank me for our teachings that I must respectfully take issue. You thank only me, when there is nothing I write that isn’t the result of constant collaboration with my wife, Susan.
Here is what I wrote in the beginning of our first book–America’s Real War (which we hope to republish soon with new sections on Islam’s impact on the world post 9-11)

Which brings me to Susan. This book is as much a product of our collaboration as are our children, for she and I have brought these ideas into being together as surely as our children are also the fruit of our unity. We write together, we home build together, we child raise together, why, we even boat and vote together. Although no word of this volume was sent to the publisher until we both agreed, to the extent you find fault, I can assure you it will be with those passages on which she yielded to me. It would make as little sense for me to thank her for her help in this book as it would make for a left leg to thank a right leg for its help in crossing a street. This is our book.

It obviously applies to all that appears in our weekly emails and on this site. Thanks for giving me the opportunity to make this point.
Cordially
RDL

Rich M says:

Fundamentally, I agree with not living in a rocking chair the final years of your life. However, I recently retired and will not miss the 35 minute drive each way which can be 1 to 3 hours when an accident or snow storm occurs. I will not miss the Human Resource training on political correctness. I will not miss that I do not have enough vacation days to visit with family and relatives located in multiple states across this great country.

I am looking forward to finishing the many “chores” around the house that my wife has been asking me to complete for several years. I’m looking forward to volunteering assistance to those even older than I am in the neighborhood. I am looking forward to buying an e-bike and traveling around my city (while getting exercise) to see interesting and historic sites that I previously did not have the time to visit.

Retirement does have some perks. 🙂

Jean says:

Rich M
I have to laugh at what you’ve written, because it sounds like my father. He retired from the post office after 30 years of working full time delivering mail on a rural route. Snow, guard dogs, potholes and the Christmas rush that kept him slogging on 14 hour days were behind him. He also worked a second job for 20 years.

After retirement, he did all of those things you mentioned – he repainted the exterior of the house, wallpapered the living room, redid the landscaping, learned to relax and enjoy life …. and promptly went back to work after a year! He didn’t need the money – frugal living, strict saving and a healthy pension + social security (govt. + private sector jobs) gave him and my mother more than enough to live on. He missed interacting with customers and feeling like he had some purpose! We knew that the day he quit working altogether, his health issues had gotten the best of him. We were right – we lost him within a few months.

I am betting that you’ll end up working again, but on your own terms this time. Telecommuting, flex time and other perks can be negotiated! And I promise I won’t say “Told ya so” when it happens.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Dear Jean–
We can tell you that our response to your lovely letter was a big warm spontaneous laugh that bubbled up from our bellies.
Thanks for writing,
Cordially
RDL

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Thanks for your joyful and funny letter, Rich,
Nearby, another reader, Jean, has set up a bet that you’ll be back at work within a year. I have only one question: Can I also get in on that bet for a few bucks?
Cordially
RDL

Ben McFie says:

This is wonderful! Some people are shocked when they find that our family does not attend a traditional church on Sundays some people even ask, When do you “worship”? We often reply that we worship God every day. Until now though I didn’t know about the common hebrew word for work and worship. This is SO COOL! Thank you for writing this post!

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

You guys are indeed worshipping God every day, Ben,
By improving the lives of so many of His children.
Yes, the Lord’s language reveals that just as your father feels served and joyful when he sees you and your siblings caring for each other, so our Father in Heaven is served when he sees us, His children, caring for one another. And a popular but false illusion is that if we make money or profit by serving another human being, that somehow strips it of its moral value. Nothing could be further from the truth. Regards
Cordially
RDL

Lisa says:

Reminds me of a documentary some years ago of a lottery winner. He quit his job as most would do. He had several houses filled with things as he just kept buying and buying and buying. Never mentioned a spouse, a kid, or any other family member. Or even a significant other. Never mentioned friends. Never mentioned donating to charities. Never mention any hobbies, besides spending money. Spending was his life. He sounded so boring, though I’m sure some would find him fascinating because of lottery money, if he has any of it left. I don’t know what ever happened to him. I always thought if I was in his situation, I would go insane. I would need to start a business of some kind even with all the money. To work is to find out one’s potential, to find one’s calling in life. Not everyone knows their calling straight from the womb.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Dear Lisa,
It’s apparently almost impossible to find lottery winners who, five years after the big win, are happier and in more successful lives than they were before.
There’s a huge happiness difference bewteeen having money you earned and having money that just fell into your lap.
Cordially,
RDL

David J says:

Related to that, for a SHORT TIME, I was wealthy on PAPER during the Dot Com Bubble. I let it ride too long. While my wife and I were upset, I got the feeling that the Lord didn’t want me to retire young, that I would be blessed in life including materially, but I should work for it. (But I am not criticizing those that make money off the stock market. I still did so, just not so dramatically.) Time to time, I think about how my life would be different had I cashed out a bit earlier than I did. Had I cashed out earlier, I wouldn’t have had the most fulfilling job of my career, which also led me to meet some of the most important people in my life. One of those saved me spiritually. I probably wouldn’t have retired yet, but I am sure my ambitions would have been curbed.

I am grateful to Rabbi Lapin in changing my perspective about money. I never believed money to be evil, but I didn’t have clarity of the role of money until Rabbi Lapin opened my eyes. Because of Rabbi Lapin, I believe I have full (or near full) clarity on the morality of making money and capitalism. I bring that into the product design of a new venture I am pursuing. My goal is to design and deliver a product providing value to my customers such that they HAPPILY trade money for my product. Before my gaining clarity, I would just design a product that seems to be a good idea, which is similar but not quite clear in its goal. Now it is clear to me. I need to provide customers VALUE, which is a win for my customers and a win for me and my business partner through the money my customers are happy to pay.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Dear David–
I am so pleased that you now enjoy a healthy and wholesome relationship with money and that I had a small role in helping you achieve this accuracy.
Wishing you much success in your new venture.
Cordially
RDL

Valerie says:

Thank you Rabbi Lapin and lovely Susan. Exactly the wisdom I need at this time. Lost all my umph and so much so much to do.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Hope the ‘oomph’ is back, Valerie,
There is much to do.
Cordially
RDL

Isaac Hashim Ibrahim says:

Hello Rabbi Daniel, I happen to come across your discussions on youtube on about two weeks ago and it has certainly generated a lot of inspiration for me. I am going through a rather difficult period financially but I am inspired by what I have listened to and read from you. I trust God to give me direction to become more fruitful in serving others and earning an income.

Thank you
God bless

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Dear Isaac,
Having the correct information is vital whether you are trying to cook an omelette or whether you are trying to make money. See more information on our website http://www.RabbiDanielLapin.com and our tv show http://www.tct.tv/watch-tct/on-demand-ajw
Wishing you good fortune
Cordially
RDL

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