If I Lived in Alabama

November 29th, 2017 Posted by Susan's Musings 67 comments

Go to jail. Do not pass Go; do not collect $200. If you grew up playing Monopoly, as I did, those words sound familiar. How about these words? You have scads of Get Out of Jail cards; pass Go whenever you want; and feel free to collect however much money as you can.

In a nutshell, the first set of rules applies to most of us while the second set applies to our elected officials. The sexual harassment spotlight is obscuring that fact.

I’m getting tired of reading that sexual harassment is a product of our patriarchal society or hearing politicians and pundits (especially females) paraphrasing the famous line spoken by Captain Renault in the movie Casablanca by pretending that they are, “Shocked, shocked to find that despicable behavior is going on here,” in the higher echelons of Hollywood, newsrooms and Congress.

Can we get real? People treating other people badly has existed since the Garden of Eden when Adam tried to evade responsibility for his sin by blaming it on Eve. Turn the page and Cain kills Abel. Keep turning pages and you will find examples of all sorts of human failings. If you aren’t drawn to the Bible, look at history and literature.

As Lord Acton famously said in 1887, “Power tends to corrupt and absolute power corrupts absolutely.” We have granted, and allowed our politicians to grab, way too much power. Certainly many, and very likely the majority, of  the anointed men and women have strayed far from public service and probity. In many ways the system is now designed to encourage them to do so. Sexual misconduct is one example of bad behavior, but focusing only on that is the equivalent of treating a high fever with aspirin. You may reduce or obscure one symptom of a serious problem, but you haven’t eliminated the underlying ailment.

I am not an Alabamian so I don’t need to answer the question of whether I would vote for Judge Moore or not. Yet, relying on that fact to avoid the question of whether I would vote for him or not if I did live in Alabama seems to be a cop-out. Having already presented two famous quotes, I will act on another oft-quoted one, “For fools rush in where angels fear to tread,” (Alexander Pope, 1711) and answer the question anyway.

The first step in searching for an answer is whether or not to believe the allegations. Here, I am going to be guided by experience. Do you remember Alaska Senator Ted Stevens? He lost his bid for re-election when he was found guilty in a federal corruption trial eight days before citizens went to the polls. Once he lost the election, the Justice Department found that there was evidence of gross prosecutorial misconduct and vacated the conviction. In other words, “We (Democrats) cheated and we won.”

How about Candy Crowley abusing her position as moderator in the Obama/Romney debate? Her behavior and  facts were wrong, but the impression left by them added fuel to Romney’s losing trend. Once again, “We (Democrats) cheated and we won.”

I could go on and on. The result is that, in the spirit of the boy who cried wolf and ended up with no one trusting him, I land on the side of cynical suspicion of any allegations made against conservatives when an election is at stake.

The next factor I consider is whether, if the allegations are true, they would stop me from voting for Roy Moore. Here, I am somewhat guided by the ideas of Madalyn Murray O’Hair whose lawsuit ended Bible readings in public school. (How’s that been working for you?) According to her son, who as a young boy was the plaintiff in the case, she understood that you could use democracy to destroy democracy. She realized that the Supreme Court might vote for laws that would destroy America in the name of American values. In other words, good people can be more easily destroyed than evil people because you can use their own morality and goodness against them.

Based on this concept, I think that even if I was sure that the allegations were true, I would cast my vote for Judge Moore. As almost everyone is openly acknowledging now, Congress is a cesspool of moral turpitude. It is well and good for today’s liberal pundits to declare in 2017 that liberals were wrong to shield President Clinton from effects of his abusive behavior towards women. They correctly opine that they were the ones to establish the principle that sexual misconduct was fine as long as your politics were politically correct. However, that belated mea culpa has no practical political consequence. It is possible—just slightly possible—that this latest explosion of publicity will herald a welcome change in Congress. Al Franken and John Conyers are by no means the only (alleged) miscreants. There are any number of Republicans and Democrats who should be quaking right now. If they are not quaking, it is because they recognize that the public’s attention span is short while their ability to be fooled is great. Ethics investigations are notorious for taking a long time and resulting in little action.

So, I would vote for Roy Moore and agree that allegations of him, along with those of dozens of other Senators and Congressman should be investigated. Let’s look at all abuses including sexual, financial, and misuse of political power. We need to decide many things including if disgusting behavior towards women one meets through one’s official capacity is the same as disgusting behavior in the role of private citizen. Do actions thirty weeks ago matter more than those that took place thirty years ago? These are all matters for discussion. But the rules need to apply across the board, not just to one’s political opponents. I’m open to hearing that if Senator Franken and Congressman Conyers, among dozens of others, are impeached or forced to resign then newly elected Senator Moore might belong on that list as well. 

Not electing him because I disapprove of his alleged behavior thirty years ago? Will he be an albatross around Republican necks? How many times do conservatives need to learn that they can possess every positive quality and exhibit only admirable behavior and cries of sexism, racism, other “isms,” and general deplorableness, up to and including wanting to push handicapped elderly people off a cliff, will be leveled against them? If Judge Moore loses, I think that down the road once again we will be taunted with the cry, “We cheated, but we won.”

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67 comments

Lynn Perrizo says:

You always put everything so perfectly into perspective for me! The fact that the democrat running holds horrible values on human life should also play a part in any decision. I’m sharing your wise words with a friend in Alabama. Blessings Susan.

Susan Lapin says:

Lynn, there are so many issues to take into consideration including, as you say, the ramifications of voting for a man whose political values run counter to what you and I believe is important for this country. It would be lovely if good values equaled good people and if everything was black and white, but that isn’t how the world works. As an example, Judge Bork would be on the Supreme Court if truth always mattered. When your opponent fights dirty, it becomes very difficult to draw the line between being a fool and being principled.

Darlene Smith says:

Good Morning! I am an Alabamian. I’ve followed Judge Moore for years, especially when the federal judge had no authority to order the removal of the monument, claiming it promoted a religion. I always ask if the judge was talking about Jewish, given the Ten Commandments come from the Old Testament. The SPLC and others began with Alabama and worked their way across this great nation of ours. Same with SCOTUS ruling that is treated as if it changes our constitution and code…it did not…those rules are still on the books! I suspect that when Judge Moore goes to Congress, he will not keep the open secrets silent…and I suspect that the bad in Congress fear him. Judge Moore speaks the truth and stands on the same principles that many of us care about. Yes, I have supported and campaigned for Judge Moore. I have gifted forward many copies of both of his books…just as I have gifted forward books from you and yours. Thank you for your words! I read often but this is the first time I have responded. Thank you. Take care. -Darlene Smith, Clay County, Alabama.

Susan Lapin says:

I’m so glad that you are a regular reader and decided to write in this time, Darlene. I hope you will do it more often. I agree that Judge Moore isn’t going to “play ball” if he is in Congress. This is the reason, I think, that the Republican establishment is eager not to see him there.

Until recently, I have voted in every major election since I was able to vote at age 18. Looking at the presidential candidates in the last national election, I could not comfortably file a ballot for either of the two major candidates.

Prior to this, I always thought it was my responsibility and duty to vote. However, for me, there was no viable candidate running.

Susan Lapin says:

A lot of people felt as you did, Margaret. I felt differently.

William Brower says:

Miss Susan,
I am an Alabamian. I know Judge Moore, and have practiced before him. I am not one of his fans, but he is a legal scholar and I have appreciated his legal opinions with regard particularly in criminal law.
What makes this particularly difficult for me is that Doug Jones is also a friend and a man I admire. He is a liberal. At this particular point in time I can not vote for my friend.
My opinion is that it is too easy to accuse a man of sexual misconduct with No Evidence. What defense does a man have?
Do not get me wrong, many men misbehave sexually and I have no sympathy for them. BUT should we convict on the bare allegation of something that happened decades ago?
I have voted in each and every election since I gained my majority, but with a heavy heart I will sit this one out and trust that God will direct Alabama and our great country in the right direction.
Bill Brower

Susan Lapin says:

I’m sure this is a difficult decision, William. Knowing both men personally must be giving you some sleepless nights.

Alan Hays says:

Mr. Brower I sympathize with your dilemma but PLEASE read your own comments and exercise your responsibility as a citizen to vote!! Take a stand!! Don’t sit on the sidelines and let a good man be smeared by anonymous accusations. If we principled people allow Judge Moore to be denied office based on anonymous charges, who knows, it may be you or me accused tomorrow? Sir, PLEASE do the right thing!!!

Tina Owens says:

Thank you Alan, I’ve been saying the same thing. If we start convicting on mere accusations, we might as well throw the whole judicial system out the window. And then we’re all endanger. Yes, our judicial system is flawed, but it is better than no system.

Alma Martin says:

But to not vote is a vote for a liberal who believes it is perfectly fine to abort a baby up to the day of delivery date as well as wanting more gun control. The democrat party is now the party of socialism, communism, fascisms, Marxism and anti-God. For the sake of our Constitution and being able to appoint a Conservative Supreme Court Judge who believes in our Constitution I pray you will go to the polls and vote for Judge Roy Moore.

Eric T. says:

I am also glad that I do not have to actually make the choice whether to vote for Judge Moore. I strongly believe there were much better candidates during the primary race, but because we live in over-caffeinated political times, none of them are on the ballot anymore. I hate that our culture has moved to the point where genuinely good and decent citizens are forced to choose between yet another progressive Democrat and yet another Republican (word removed).

There are plenty of Republican, conservative, and religious voters (not always as much overlap there as we think) who are persuaded by the idea that Jon Conyers and Al Franken and who knows how many others still sitting in Congress on the other side of the aisle somehow excuses past sins on our side. And some of Moore’s most zealous critics and attackers are making excuses and smarmy apologies for Conyers and Franken, et al.

Could I vote for him, if it meant keeping Jones out of that seat? Maybe. I don’t know, honestly. I hate that he has put the voters of Alabama into a binary choice, though. If character no longer matters, because sustaining partisan power is the overriding goal, I struggle to see how that’s healthy for our republic.

Susan Lapin says:

Eric, you are right that the system as it is now works against men or women of noble character. It also favors presentation over principle. But that is the reality. I don’t see it changing anytime soon.

Alma Martin says:

What happen to “Innocent until proven guilty”? Doug Jones has his skeletons also.

Susan Lapin says:

I’m not sure in this day and age that there is anyone without skeletons. Or whether there ever has been. A society has to decide what crossing the line means and I don’t believe we have agreement on what that is.

Anthony says:

Thanks for sharing. All those in power sexually abusing our daughters, sisters & Moms must be thrown out of power! Our children and neighbors deserve better. Judge Roy Moore has such a proven track record, it seems very clear that he is innocent! A fellow military captain shared story of how an officer tricked them to a drink in Vietnam, that ended in a brothel. Even as a young man, Roy Moore immediately walked away. Women who dated him before he was married, confirm he was always a gentleman. Plus the ones accusing him include proven court cases where the accuser lost custody to Grandma because of Roy Moore’s honorable representation protecting a 12 year old from a drug & rage induced teenager who got pregnant at 15 and others are now shown to have had years of problems before their alleged fake attacks.

I know Judge Roy Moore would happily welcome an honorable person like Senator Ted Cruz to lead an investigation into the washington cartel, since The Texas senator already got into trouble with mcconnell & crew for exposing their deceptive tactics. All published in his book!

Susan Lapin says:

Anthony, you have obviously spent more time on this than I have. I hope your assessment of Judge Moore is accurate. If it isn’t, he should be held to the standard of everyone else. But he should not be a sacrificial offering by the Republicans.

Luda R. says:

Susan,
Thank you for your musings! They are always very precise and insightful.
I have a question for you and Rabbi Lapin. A question that I often think about.
Conservatives, Republicans are self-reliant, individualistic by design, so to speak – we are all very different in degree of our conservatism and highly independent in our opinions… We live by the law. We answer to the higher authority…
Leftist are co-dependent and have one common opinion by design, for them party line is the rule of law. It is generalization, but being from the former soviet union, I recognize the traits – highly hierarchical gang mentality, everything goes for the “greater good”…
Now my question is this: keeping that major difference in mind – can we ever win? Or are we (conservatives) doomed?
Thank you for your continuous fight for us!

Susan Lapin says:

Luda, we know many former citizens of the USSR who gape at Americans trading freedom for dependency. I think that with a religious awakening, we can bring America back to its founding principles and at the same time embrace the positive ways in which those principles are able to be expressed in our times.

Alma Martin says:

And we will NOT get it with ANY democrats being voted into any Office. Their party is Anti-God….that simple!

Art Carnrick says:

I think the women’s lib movement had lost its power to say, “NO”… Back when I was younger if you gave a lady / gal an unwelcome advance, you were usually slapped or she threatened to tell daddy or her big brother. Also, since 1975 everywhere I worked if you even dated somebody at the office it was risky, so I never did… people can change their minds on what is welcome and unwelcome. I don’t think Moore did what was alleged, but if he did do something bad and was truly repentant and could bring morality back to Washington D.C. I’m all for a change.

Susan Lapin says:

Art, I too remember when dating anyone in your workplace and certainly a lower-level employee wasn’t permitted. Women and men have been sold a bill of false goods. We opened the door to sexual freedom and now are finding that all sorts of things come through open doors. Men taking advantage of women always happened, but at least there was consensus as to what was right and what was wrong. In a moral-free environment, you can’t have that.

Carolyn Forte says:

Your reasoning is right on target, Susan. I couldn’t agree more. Thankyou for a very articulate argument.

Susan Lapin says:

Thank you, Carolyn. I find that writing helps me organize my thoughts.

Alma Martin says:

AMEN!! 🙂

Mary Johnson says:

This predicament is a good example why the constitution originally had state senators to be appointed by their state legislatures. We would not have these political problems if the senators reported to their respective states and not to the national political party. I am for full repeal of the 17th Amendment to the Constitution. Return the power of recall of these reprehensible representatives back to the states.

Susan Lapin says:

Mary, I have been reading discussions about this but can’t say that I know enough yet to have an opinion. Each method has its drawbacks. We wouldn’t have changed if the original way was working so well. Thank you for weighing in on this.

Lynn Perrizo says:

Mark Levin talks about this in one of his books but I don’t remember which one. I believe it was Woodrow Wilson who implemented the change from state legislature appointment to election for senators.

Susan Lapin says:

It is something I should know more about, Lynn. Thanks.

Joyce R. says:

I believe the Mark Levin book that Lynn refers to is The Liberty Amendments. It is still available on Amazon. This book also is the basis for many of the constitutional amendments the Convention of States movement proposes. Very thought provoking, as are all Mark’s books.

Kevin says:

I appreciate your candor. I believe that there is a strong possibility that the allegations regarding Judge Moore are false. As we learn that the main accuser’s mother, who Moore represented in a custody case for the accuser, stated that her daughter “has a violent nature and has been treated by a psychiatrist when she was approximately 15 years of age.” The accuser bore a grudge with Moore for placing her with her mother. In 2010 the accuser “was arrested and pled guilty to felony fraud charges related to checks belonging to a family member. She also entered a court drug program.” Her lawyer, the infamous Aldred, refuses to release “evidence” for 3rd party validation. Oh, and the accuser worked for the Clinton campaign. There’s also that. As you said of the Democrats, “We cheated, but we won.”

Don’t get me wrong, if Moore is guilt he should face full accountability. But what if, just if, Moore is actually innocent? You ask how many decades ago could he have grabbed a teenagers rear end and still be held accountable and how that compares to other crimes. *IF* he is innocent – if we can bring ourselves to accept the real possibility that he actually COULD be innocent, as “innocent until proven guilty” should still have bearing in America – how does not grabbing a buttocks compare to maliciously destroying an innocent person’s career and life’s reputation? Why do those who do so get away without any repercussions?

“We cheated, but we won.” Or, “the ends justify the means.” IF Moore wins it will be because the people of Alabama are tired of Democrat lies and are seeing thru them.

Susan Lapin says:

I’m at arms-length here, Kevin. I don’t know people in Alabama to find out what the “under the radar” conversations are saying.

Tanya Wilson says:

Hi Susan,
Even if the allegations prove to be true, I would still vote for him if I were from Alabama.
A person can change a great deal in 30 years time and there haven’t been any more recent allegations. If he were a sexual deviant I believe there would be more women coming forward.

Susan Lapin says:

That is a good point, Tanya. I also don’t know what the culture was in Alabama 30 years ago and whether what sounds upsetting, if true, on paper today was a different matter then and there. For example, it isn’t so weird to me that a man in his early thirties would date a 17 or 18 year old. There are cultures still today where that is the norm.

Flayeer says:

Roy Moore was very preoccupied with his career – Academy, military service, law school. He was 30 years old when he finally entered his first civilian profession as an assistant district attorney. I hear that in the 70s women in the South would marry young, usually right after graduating from high school. It doesn’t bother me that Moore, a single and eligible bachelor, was looking for a wife with whom to settle down and have a family. In my day, he would have been quite the “catch.” Most of the women closer to his age were likely already married and divorced with a few children or women with inflexible careers. I personally do not believe any of the women. There are too many inconsistencies, an obvious forgery, an improbable timeline and multiple holes in their accounts. Plus they are only coming forward now after 4 decades just before a contentious national race that threatens the balance of the Senate. Perverts are obsessed and do not engage in their perversions for the span of only one year. They cannot stop themselves and the behavior continues even when under close scrutiny (think Bill Clinton, Anthony Wiener, Harvey Weinstein). I am not an Alabama resident so cannot vote but I certainly can and did donate. By the way, I am stunned by the sudden turn to Victorian values that women who only a few years ago had a completely opposite view. Will smelling salts and lace hankies become all the rage? As usual, Chabad has it right – no touching, never alone with the opposite sex, and moderation in dress and actions.

Susan Lapin says:

I too find it a bit amusing that women who have paraded and championed getting rid of all traditional moral seem to be calling people out for lack of ladylike and gentlemanly behavior. BTW – the ideas you mention at the end are not exclusive to the Chabad branch of Judaism. They are the standard in the traditionally religious community.

Ty Steward says:

I can’t vote for Roy Moore so I sent him a campaign contribution instead. Democrats often smear opponents just before election day. The goal needs to be to defeat the Left before they destroy us. Had Hillary won the Presidency, I shudder to think.

Susan Lapin says:

Ty, good for you for taking a stand.

Alma Martin says:

God Bless you for doing so. I am voting for Judge Moore and I also donated.

Joyce R. says:

As usual, your analysis brings much clarity to a very murky “scandal”. As a lawyer, I have been troubled that Congressional leadership immediately found these allegations very believable and persuasive. These are mere allegations untested in a court of law where both parties have the opportunity to bring evidence, examine and cross-examine witnesses, and have an unbiased judge or jury determine the truth. I expected such bias from the Dems and the MSM; but I hoped that someone in the party of Lincoln would say, hold it, let us investigate, and see what we can learn especially given that these allegations are 40 years or more old.

Furthermore, Judge Moore has been in the public eye for a very long time. He has been a very controversial figure for his stands on issues like display of the Ten Commandments in public venues and his rejection of the SCOTUS’ decision on samesex marriage. I find myself asking, given the years’ long controversies surrounding Judge Moore’s public service, why have these allegations, if they are true, never surfaced before?

I am not a Republican or a Democrat, but I am very conservative. I long for our nation to return to the ancient paths and stand firm for God and the standards of morality He has established in His Torah.

If I were voting in Alabama, I would vote for Judge Moore. Why? Because I can judge the observable fruit of his life, the stands he has taken on moral issues important to me. I can see that he has been consistent on those issues. I can see that he has been willing to take the consequences for not backing down. I cannot see the truth or falsity of the allegations made against him as the evidence stands now. I cannot Judge his heart, that is a matter for the Sovereign Lord. But I can look at his denial in the light of the stands he has taken on other moral issues and give him the benefit of the doubt. Of course, that does not mean that, if he is elected, the allegations should not be investigated, just as the allegations against other, already sitting, members of Congress should be investigated. But if he is elected, he should be sworn in and seated and accorded all the privileges of his office while the Senate Ethics Committee conducts that investigation.

Susan Lapin says:

Joyce, I too was appalled at how quickly Republican leadership betrayed Judge Moore rather than suggesting a “wait and find out the facts” attitude. Quite frankly, the swamp includes members of both political parties and there is more than enough evidence to attack those whose guilt is much less in question.

Gordy Beil says:

A person should be convicted or found innocent by proof (or lack of same) not by allegations! A few quotes and then I’ll close: “In politics, reality and appearance are of equal importance. You cannot attend to one and neglect the other. A man must determine both what he is, and what others believe him to be.”-Steven Saylor & “In the land of bleating sheep and braying jackasses, one brave and honest man is bound to create a scandal.” -Edward Abbey. Take care, Gordy.

Susan Lapin says:

Thanks for the quotes, Gordy.

Kristin Grose says:

So beautifully laid out…exactly my sentiments, Susan. Your Musings column is a favorite of mine. I have a niggling feeling thought that there is a reason every morning brings a new “scalp” or two. I’m not surprised and grateful that miscreants are finally being brought to justice but suspicious nonetheless. I think the eventual big target the is the President. Blessings.

Susan Lapin says:

Kristin, we know that both Republican leadership and the Democrat Party have it in for the president. However, once you unleash a storm it is much harder to control where it wreaks its damage. Interesting times.

Tim Leightner says:

Mrs. Lapin,
Thank you so much for taking the time to post your musings and especially this one on Judge Roy Moore. Your words and the words of Rabbi Lapin are such a welcome breath of fresh air when compared to the news stories out there…..even almost all of the news stories on conservative talk radio. I rejoice to read clear thinking firmly based on God’s Word. As the Psalmist says in many places those kind of words are sweet like honey and like water to a person in a dry and thirsty land. Thank you.

Susan Lapin says:

Thank you for your kind words, Tim.

Ian says:

When I was 19, we moved closer to an uncle who had two step daughters who were respectively 14 and 15. These two young ladies were not my blood relation, and totally besotted with me. The attraction was clear. My mother took me aside and said, “Young ladies on the cusp of womanhood can have feelings that they don’t quite understand. A gentleman does not exploit these feelings”. My family explained to me both by example and by words how to be a gentleman. A gentleman whether of 19, 22, or 32 does not go to shopping malls and “cruise” underage girls. Judge Moore is accused by women –women who have been found credible by Republican senators- of trying to seduce and take advantage of young women. This behavior is inappropriate. It doesn’t matter how many Democrats or Republicans are guilty of the same or similar behavior. The issue ought to be, how do we want to live?. What kind of world do we want to create?.

Is my family an exception? Not at all. Let me remind you of this dialogue from an old movie, “The Philadelphia Story”:
Mike (James Stewart): Kittredge, it may interest you to know that the so-called ‘affair’ consisted of exactly two kisses and a rather late swim…All of which I thoroughly enjoyed, and the memory of which I wouldn’t part with for anything… After which I deposited Tracy on her bed in her room, and promptly returned down here to you two – which doubtless you’ll remember.
Tracy (Katherine Hepburn) : Why? Was I so unattractive, so distant, so forbidding, or something – that – ?
George (John Howard): Well, this is fine talk, too.
Tracy (Katherine Hepburn): I’m asking a question.
Mike (James Stewart): You were extremely attractive, and as for distant and forbidding, on the contrary. But you also were a little the worse – or the better – for wine, and there are rules about that.
Tracy (Katherine Hepburn): Thank you, Mike. I think men are wonderful.
There was a time when it was expected that “men would be wonderful”. That is the world we should try to create.

Maimonides said, “One should see the world, and see himself as a scale with an equal balance of good and evil. When he does one good deed the scale is tipped to the good – he and the world is saved. When he does one evil deed the scale is tipped to the bad – he and the world is destroyed.” I believe your “musing” which suggests that we should turn a blind eye to inappropriate behavior is off the mark.
Judge Judy (Judy Sheindlin) says, “They want to do the right thing, most people. For that little core that doesn’t want to do the right thing and gets away with it routinely, most people want to see them get a good whupping. And I am your girl.”.

I wish that you had come out and said that if Judge Moore is guilty of in appropriate behavior he should get a “whupping” in the election.

The world is tipped towards evil every time we excuse bad behavior with a wink and a nod. And the people who we excuse never truly help us. At best they become golems in our midst. And your suggestion that giving a pass to Judge Moore is realpolitik, since the Democrats will say “we cheated, but we won” does not quite ring true. Some elected Democrats such as Kathleen Rice have said that all elected officials -including Democrats- who are guilty of sexual harassment should resign.

Susan Lapin says:

Ian, I am glad that you were raised to be a gentleman and we can definitely use more of them – and of ladies. We won’t know if Judge Moore is guilty before the election. That was my point. Let him be elected and then be treated exactly the same as dozens of other Senators and Congressman. Speech, whether by Kathleen Rice or others, is easy. When I see politicians stepping down I will accept that there has been a change.

Alma Martin says:

You are wrong. There is no evidence that “cruised” the mall and the mall manager/owner was found and he said Moore was never “kicked out” of the mall. Don’t even know if he was there at all. Not one shred of evidence has been found to be true of the allegations against Moore but many things have been found out about the women who have come forward including dishonesty. PLEASE let’s keep American with the “innocent until proved guilty”.

Jean says:

If I were an Alabama voter, it would be difficult to vote for Judge Moore… except that I also remember the Democrats playing out of the same handbook in 2012 with the same type of allegations against Herman Cain. These allegations came to nothing, but it just “looked” bad.

I really don’t believe that the American voter is as stupid – or has the short memory – that the Democrats think. The pattern of lying, cheating and smear tactics used against their opponents has worn out its welcome. Combine that with the ever diminishing credibility and influence of mainstream media, and you have an atmosphere in which any news of wrongdoing will be greeted with skepticism.

Given that Moore has not been accused of continuing any kind of bad behavior AND that in fact, he held more power over people’s day to day lives as a judge than he would as a senator, the allegations seem to be too little and way too late. In addition, the label “pedophile” has been slung pretty loosely; a little fact checking would find that in the 1970s, the age of consent in Alabama WAS 14. These girls were considered to be marriage-age in that state.

If the media types wish to have the vapors over pedophilia, they might want to do some research into the Orange County cases that have happened within the last 5 – 6 years. Here, social workers encouraged marriages between girls as young as 14 to men in their 30s. The reason? Both parties were illegals, the girls were pregnant and the social workers didn’t want to turn the men over to law enforcement on statutory rape charges because LEOs might inform the feds of their immigration status. Marriage “fixed” the problem. Orange County – Democrat control – sanctuary state – real corruption.

Susan Lapin says:

Jean, you are making some important points. I’m not familiar with the Orange County cases you reference, but like many others I do feel that government and media have little credibility. We know that terrible things are going on and that we “little people” are getting the raw end of the stick.

Dale says:

I’m not sure how I would vote on this one – thankfully it is not within my ability, not being from Alabama and not being willing to ‘guess’ based on what I think I know.

My grandmother always stated something to the effect: would you trust this person with your children or your money (regarding acquaintances) ? Or more broadly, would you invite that person into your house (this, regarding watching television)?

Given that, my grandma says I should vote ‘no’ . . . .

Personally I don’t trust the government policing the government: “As almost everyone is openly acknowledging now, Congress is a cesspool of moral turpitude.”

Thank you always for your insight and your ability to show a reasoned approach instead of what, for most, is just a stating of thoughtless opinion.

Susan Lapin says:

Dale, I’m all for wise grandmothers.

James says:

Veteran Russo-British actor Peter Ustinov wrote an autobiography Dear Me, in which he imparted many jewels of note, for example, to the effect that ‘today it matters not what virtues a man possesses, what matters is the absence of vices.’ And in today’s media kangaroo courts a man seems guilty until proven innocent, a travestic contradiction of justice, for it is easy to prove a man guilty, whereas it is nearly impossible to prove innocence.

Yet it is strangely satisfying that the liberal Left panderers who invoked the demon of sexual misconduct to besiege the Right are now falling prey to the depredations of the very same demon. To quote Goethe’s Faust once more, ‘Und die Geister die er rief, wird er nicht mehr los.’ I would paraphrase: And the demons which the Left invoked in malice to destroy their adversaries, now haunt the Left to madness. May the sexual harassment card hang like a millstone round the necks of those who wrongfully and spitefully use it.

Susan Lapin says:

You always have such interesting quotes, James.

Francie Chenoweth says:

As always you are right on.
We met you and your husband at New Beginnings in Dallas, our church, when our visit with them
coincided with your visit which was a real treat as we follow you from Georgia!

Susan Lapin says:

I’m so glad we overlapped at New Beginnings. It is one of our very favorite places. Pastors Larry and Tiz are wonderful leaders.

Brian F. Tucker says:

A wise person once said “the truth doesn’t matter, what is perceived as truth matters”.

Brian

Susan Lapin says:

Only in the short term, Brian. But that short term can lead to many years of suffering like the 70 years of Communism in the USSR.

Robin D Rush says:

Religion and Politics continue to ruffle feelings and opinions, especially in this column. One of the commenters here stated “The democrat party is now the party of socialism, communism, fascisms, Marxism and anti-God”. A very abrasive assumption. I choose not to attack what has been said here, nor will I assume to know all the intrinsic components of political parties. I am a registered Democrat AND a licensed therapist, an ordained minister, a seminary graduate, and a published author. I enjoy watching Rabbi and Susan Lapin on television and reading Ask the Rabbi and Susan’s Musing on their website. An opinion is subjective and I choose not to become offended by the statements made here. I have gathered from this column that a being a Democrat and a forthright godly person is an anomaly.

Susan Lapin says:

Robin, thank you for bringing attention to the broad generalization of that comment and how making blanket assumptions isn’t the best way to talk. I imagine you read and hear much here or on TCT with which you disagree and that makes you a valuable and open-minded reader. I hope you will continue to speak up.

Dennis Fite says:

I love to read the articles from both you and Rabbi Lapin but I must say I am deeply disturbed by your statement: “I think that even if I was sure that the allegations were true, I would cast my vote for Judge Moore.” While I have views that coincide with the Judge, my problem with your statement is that since Judge Moore has stated that the allegations are not true, if they are true, he is an obvious liar. I don’t think we need another liar in any seat of government. If he had confessed to the allegations and stated that he had sought God’s forgiveness and turned from such behavior, that would be different. I feel for the people of Alabama since it is all too difficult to arrive at the truth.

Susan Lapin says:

Dennis, you are making an excellent point and one that I hadn’t considered. I think I agree with you that blatantly lying (which is different than not remembering something clearly) would be a valid reason not to vote for him since that would reflect the person he is now rather than who he was thirty years ago. Though it does leave the conundrum that one of the reasons President Trump won was because there was a low moral threshold in terms of traditional morality. This was partly because both candidates would not have passed an honor test so the choice was much of a muchness but also because he never pretended to be traditionally moral.

William Brower says:

Miss Susan, Less anyone labor under a misapprehension, I have a hard time accepting Judge Moore for reasons not related to the sexual accusations that have been leveled against him. These reasons are publicly available and I won’t go into them on this forum.
I am disturbed by some of the comments accusing Doug Jones of supporting the typical liberal / Democrat agenda.
While, to my knowledge, he supports a woman’s abortion rights, he does not support late term abortions except in the case of medical endangerment to the mother. Period
Doug is a supporter of our Second Amendment gin rights.
Although he served as United States Attorney for the Northern District of Alabama, I found him fair and protective of the right of the accused and the victims. He prosecuted a number of high profile cases including Eric Rudolph for bombings both in Atlanta’s Centennial Park and a Birmingham abortion clinic. In both cases lives were lost.
He successfully prosecuted the last of the Sixteenth Street Church bombers.
He went after the white collar scandals that plagued Birmingham and Jefferson County Alabama. Locking up many public officials in the process.
No, Doug Jones is a fine principled gentleman whom I would be proud to support under other circumstances.
But the balance of power in Washington is too precarious for me to support a Democrat right now.
Because I can not support Judge Moore for reasons not related to the spurious secular misconduct charges (wich I do not believe at all) I can not risk endangering the sweeping sea change taking place on Washington. I will luff my sail and see how the wind blows in our Senatorial elections next year . Maybe a gentleman or gentlewoman of good character and repute will run.
I will sit this one out and pray for God’s wise guidance.
Bill Brower

Susan Lapin says:

Bill, I appreciate your defense of Doug Jones. I know little about him and actually because there wasn’t any personal pushback on his life or on actions he’s taken, I make the assumption that he must be a fine man. As for abortion, that remains for many people the one issue that directs their vote. As you say, the balance of power is very precarious and the platforms of the two parties matter a great deal. I’m always glad to hear from people who are more in the know than I am.

kemper c. stone says:

I’d be inclined to vote for the candidate who’d support and advance the priorities that mattered most to me, even if he was an unrepentant sinner, jerk and crumb-bum, ESPECIALLY in a general election, in campaign where scandalous accusations that have been held back during the primary campaigns are so likely to leave the majority of voters without any candidate that’s agreeable to them. What most disgusted me about Moore is the rhetoric he used to squishily deny that he’d hustled under-aged girlies in the distant past. I can’t quote precisely, but he said something like “that certainly doesn’t conform with my recollection of my personal dating style back in those days.”
It’s his record one controversial issues as a judge that bugs me most. The notion that planting stellae with graven translations of the Ten Commendments in courts buildings or in the landscaping does not conform with sincere, enlightened practice of Judeo-Christian beliefs, and it seems to me that those who’re most adamant about such displays and stron, public, self-righteous language are the folks least likely to make a good faith effort to lead lives consistent with the directions of holy scriture.
Here’s a serious question for you and your spouse: The Commandment forbidding fabrication of graven images, the worship thereof, and other such teachings seems like something we should take seriously, even if we have a liberal, “reform” attitude to all those ancient rules. I’m uncomfortable with with the Roman Catholic enthusiasm for statues, saints, holy relics, praying to saints, Passion Plays, and ritual, non-lethal flagellation and crucifixion. I find it absurd that so many Western images of jesus depict him as a blonde and blue-eyed. My Sunday school ever mentioned the Ark of the Covenant, and I was unaware of it until it was introduced to me by George Lucas and indiana Jones. Seems to me that if there was ANYTHING that we shouldn’t be making “graven images” of, it’d be the tablets given to Moses, God, the Son of God, and the prophet Mohammed. Seems to me that Muslims take their faith more seriously and literally than most Christians. I’d be interested what rabbinical attitudes might be regarding political exploitation of the Tablets and Ten Commandments by erecting models of them in or around courthouses, or anywhere else. Please clue me in!

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