First Baptist pastor Robert Jeffress is attacked by Jewish journalist quoting his rabbi

June 21st, 2018 Posted by On Our Mind 5 comments

Pastor Robert Jeffress displays what I believe to be admirable courage in resisting the invidious idea that Judeo-Christian, Bible-based faith must to be stuffed out of sight where it can inflict no influence on American culture. He and his church, Dallas’ First Baptist erected a bill-board advertising the church’s commitment to faith and freedom and mentioned the name of Pastor Jeffress’ sermon for this coming Sunday-America is a Christian Nation.
This triggered macro-aggressions in Jewish journalist Robert Wilonsky who wrote an angry polemic slamming Pastor Jeffress in the Dallas News. Why do I mention the Jewish faith of this journalist? Only because he himself drew attention to it right near the beginning of his furious tirade against Pastor Jeffress. “My rabbi warned me there would be days like this.” Well, I have no idea of who his rabbi is, but I am deeply distressed that again, secularized Americans of Jewish ancestry should play conspicuous roles in the attempt to create a post-Christian America.
I have written extensively elsewhere and spoken many times explaining why Jews and other non-Christian minorities should be grateful that this is indeed a Christian nation so I won’t go into that again here. Politics is really nothing more than the practical application of our most deeply held values and the crusade to make sure that all values have a place at the political table other than Christian is dangerous. I support Pastor Jeffress’ work in bringing Judeo Christian Bible based values to greater relevance and prominence in the culture.
Whether one agrees with Pastor Robert Jeffress’ politics and theology or one does not, anyone passionate about freedom and open debate in America has to be troubled by the attempts to silence the good pastor which resulted in the removal of the billboard for which he paid. Even if it is only his opinion that America is a Christian nation, that opinion needs to be censored?
This rabbi finds that development deeply disturbing.

5 comments

David J says:

I am in my 50s. It used to be the practice that the different sides of an argument would make their case, and the interested parties would decide which side made the best case. For the last few years, there no longer seems to be any debate, not even debate to shut down debate.

Things tend to go like this case with Pastor Jeffress, someone will feel offended, or feign offense. Rather than make a rebuttal, they will shame or intimidate platforms not to allow the other side to make their case. We no longer have a marketplace of ideas. Intimidation, sometimes even violence is employed to shut down the other side. (E.g. speakers at colleges have had their events shut down over threats of violence.) I think this will not only lead to unwise choices, but oppression.

I don’t know how we can effect a return to a marketplace of ideas, but it must be done for the health of our society. If someone has any ideas of how we can return to a marketplace of ideas, I hope to hear them and hope to implement the viable ideas.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Couldn’t agree with you more, David,
But the ills from which our culture suffers need more than a few ideas to heal. They need nothing less than another great religious reawakening in America.
Cordially
RDL

Lynn Baumgartner says:

I couldn’t agree with the both of you more and will agree with you in prayer asking God to heal America by reawakening us with His Truth by His Holy Spirit through His Love!

Mary Vickoren says:

It seems to me that the secular Left believes they are the only ones allowed into the Marketplace, and the rest of us are cut off, criticized, cursed, and ridiculed for
having opposing opinions. I have a MA degree, and even in 2008 it required keeping my mouth shut. At some
point, I decided that my tuition dollars were as green as others, and I began politely and respectfully to express
disagreement with others. I gave what facts I believed supported my position. Many people emailed me to say they felt the same way but were afraid to say it.
In 2009, I was admitted to a PhD program at a major university known for their graduate degrees. The criticisms, the hatred, and the disrespect there were unbelievable. One of the instructors was a Baptist. I tried to talk to him about things, even though I am not Baptist. He wouldn’t talk to me, and gave me the minimum grade required to pass his class and stay in the Program. Sadly, I couldn’t handle work, school, and caring for a young child, so I left after the first year. I came close to having a breakdown fending off the unwarranted attacks every day.
I didn’t get my PhD, but all things work together for good for those who love God and are called according to His Purpose.

Rabbi Daniel Lapin says:

Perhaps not getting your PhD, Mary,
Is even more of a tribute to you than getting it would have been. Although like all generalizations it can be unfair to many, I have often observed that some things in today’s culture are so asinine, they could only have been conceived of by someone with a doctorate degree in a non-science subject.
Cordially
RDL

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